July 9, 2013 - 1 comment.

FoxySync: How to Synchronize Your Website with FoxyCart

FoxySyncIf you've ever done an e-commerce integration, then you know what a pain it can be. Traditionally you'd build a shopping cart, create a checkout workflow, and integrate with a third party payment gateway. Ultimately you spend a lot of time writing and testing new code for an old task. I've done a few of these integrations, and the last time I did I tried something new: FoxyCart.

I wanted to try FoxyCart because it would allow me to outsource the shopping cart, checkout, and payment gateway integration. As a result I could clean up my code base, reduce my maintenance costs, and setup for an easy payment gateway switch in the future. Making FoxyCart work with my Ruby on Rails app, however, was not a cinch. There were no Ruby gems to work with and examples in Ruby were sparse. I knew I'd have to figure out a lot of the integration on my own so I thought I'd make it easy for the next Rubyist and cut a gem out of the work. That gem is called FoxySync.

FoxySync encapsulates four FoxyCart integrations: cart validation, single sign on, XML data feed, and API communication. Using all together fully synchronizes and secures all communication between your app and the FoxyCart service. Let's take a look at each.

Cart Validation

Since FoxyCart knows very little about your products, it depends on you to post any metadata—including price—when customers add items to a cart. As a default, the metadata is stored as plain text in the web page where the “Add to cart” button lives. This is risky because, if someone knows what they're doing, they could change the price of your product before it’s sent to FoxyCart. To prevent such tampering, FoxyCart offers HMAC product verification, or what I like to call cart validation. The feature works by validating a hash on each piece of metadata to ensure authenticity. FoxySync makes this easy by providing a helper method to generate the correct HTML form variables.

include FoxySync::CartValidation
cart_input_name 'code', 'mai', 'mai'
# results in <input type="hidden" name="code||5651608dde5a2abeb51fad7099fbd1a026690a7ddbd93a1a3167362e2f611b53" value="mai" />

Single Sign On

FoxyCart keeps an account for each user that checks out on your site, but with a good integration, those customers shouldn’t even know they’re using it. That being the case, it's weird to ask them to reauthenticate on the checkout page if they’re already logged into your site. FoxyCart's single sign on feature prevents this weirdness by asking your application to acknowledge authentication before the checkout page is displayed. FoxyCart makes a request to your site and your application redirects back to FoxyCart. FoxySync helps with this handshake by providing a helper method to generate the redirect URL.

include FoxySync::Sso
redirect_to sso_url(params, user)

XML Datafeed

FoxyCart's transaction datafeed feature ensures that your application is notified of sale details after each successful checkout. When enabled, FoxyCart will post to your application an encrypted XML document and expect a particular response. FoxySync helps with this feature by handling the XML decryption and providing a helper to generate the appropriate response.

include FoxySync::Datafeed
receipt = []
xml = datafeed_unwrap params
receipt << xml.customer_first_name
receipt << xml.customer_last_name
receipt << xml.receipt_url
# etc
datafeed_response

API Communication

FoxyCart has a robust API that lets you manipulate and retrieve data about your store, customers, transactions, and subscriptions. FoxySync makes working with the API dead simple, so you can easily access this powerful feature.

api = FoxySync::Api::Messenger.new
reply = api.customer_get :customer_email => 'foo@bar.com'
reply.customer_id # is the customer's FoxyCart id

FoxyCart is a great service for adding sophisticated e-commerce to your website without having to do a lot of the hard work. However, FoxyCart still needs to be integrated, and for Ruby on Rails apps, FoxySync makes that pretty easy.

Published by: Chris Stump in Business, Developers
Tags: , , ,

Comments

Brett Florio
July 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm

That’s awesome, Chris. Thanks for sharing with the community 🙂

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