Table XI Blog

Product Design

January 25, 2019No Comments

Accessible software design always knows its audience

Accessible software design doesn’t happen on accident. If I design based on my own instincts, the software will work great for someone exactly like myself — with all the same abilities and preferences. I can see the difference between red and green, so I wouldn’t think twice about putting those colors next to each other in a layout. It’s only when someone with colorblindness tries to use the site that it doesn’t work at all.

All good design starts with thinking about the audience, and accessible software design is no different. If, instead of assuming everyone would see it like me, I took the time to run my layout through color checkers for different types of colorblindness, we’d skip the problem above and anyone would be able to use the site.

Read more

March 28, 2018No Comments

Why do user research? To build products people love

Too many companies realize why they should do user research too late, when they’ve already missed out on opportunities to make product development more effective, deliver high-impact launches and capture market share.

Read more

January 25, 20181 Comment

How to conduct user research in a one-week sprint

We know what user research is and why it has value. The next step is learning how to conduct user research in cost-effective way that still delivers maximum impact. A sprint is a user research methodology that allows you to gain insights on a target audience in just one week. The user research process works in any industry and for companies of any size, and it’s repeatable — if you need more insight or help understanding another group, the same process can be used each time.

Read more

October 7, 2016No Comments

5 tips for conducting user interviews to build better products

On any project, the UX team is trying to answer two big questions: What should we build, and did we build it right?

Read more

July 14, 20161 Comment

What the GV Design Sprint taught me about the value of UX

For the client, the goal of working with a tech consultancy is simple — get as much value to the business as possible for your money. That’s how it should work. That’s how we want it to work. Clients are supposed to push back on us, ask questions about what we’re doing and help us align our work with their goals. Even if that means asking “What is this, can we cut it?”

As a project manager, it’s my job to help clients understand the value of what we’re doing. But when clients would ask about UX design, I didn’t feel like I had a good answer. I know that the value is there, but I could not voice it to my clients as well as I can for development.

I wanted to be able to better inform my clients and better advocate for my coworkers, so I added getting a better understanding of UX design to my professional development goals. I didn’t have joining a GV Design Sprint in mind, but when a new client hired us to work on a new product idea, joining the UX design team for two weeks on two GV Design Sprints seemed like the perfect way to get a crash course in design. Table XI covered the cost of me joining the sprint as an investment in my growth, so my participation was free to the client, and I was able to contribute while continuing to manage my other projects.

Read more

July 7, 2016No Comments

How a Google design sprint creates a testable prototype in a week

If you want to know the full power of a Google product design sprint, consider this: In one week we’re able to identify a new product or feature, build a prototype, and test it on real users. That’s impressive enough, but what’s truly remarkable is that design sprints let us do all this alongside our clients — and without tears or late nights. If anything, it makes us a stronger, better team.

Read more

April 5, 2016No Comments

How we use the GV design critique to find problems before they cost you money

GV Design Critique

I usually explain it to clients with this story: A bunch of admirals were asked to plan out a military campaign for a written exam. They were all accomplished strategists, but when confronted with a blank piece of paper, they all failed the test. So the navy paired them off, allowing each team to share notes. Instantly they started acing the test. All it took was that little bit of outside perspective, all of the sudden you see a bigger picture.

Read more

July 29, 2014No Comments

The UX of Movie Night

txi-movie-night

Movie nights are a time-honored tradition at Table XI. Iterating over summers we’ve learned a lot about what it takes to put on a great show. What exactly does it take? Let me tell you using a few UX principles.

Read more

July 1, 20141 Comment

The UX of Scandinavia

scandinavia

Or, how a vacation taught my family what I do at work.

Do your grandparents squint when you refer to usability testing? Is your roommate nonplussed when you name drop the great Don Norman?  Are you passionate about what you do but have trouble explaining it? If so, you and I might share a similar user issue.

Read more

February 3, 2014No Comments

Weather: A User Experience

Airplane view of New York City in the winterChicago’s talking about the weather more than usual, don't you think?

No longer just a small talk cliché, getting accurate information about The Weather has become a matter of survival. The polar vortex is waiting for us and we need to know how bad it is out there.

Looking for answers, I typed “weather” into Google. Weather.com was the first result. I naively assumed I’d come to the right place.

Read more

Table XI

328 S. Jefferson St.
Suite 670
Chicago, IL 60661
312.450.6320

Workshops

Give your team new problem-solving techniques with our innovating workshops and check out our event series.

GoodFirms Badge